miércoles, 22 de febrero de 2012

Trafficking, Prostitution, and Inequality. Catherine MacKinnon



Catharine A. MacKinnon
International Women´s Human Rights: Paradigms, Paradoxes, and Possibilities, a Sawyer Seminar organized by the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality, addresses contradictions within the concept and practice of women´s human rights. The year-long program will include public lectures, symposia, faculty seminars, an undergraduate workshop and a large international conference in spring quarter, Engendering Rights in India: The Colonial Encounter and Beyond.  Made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Catharine A. MacKinnon, Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, specializes in sex equality issues under international and constitutional law. She pioneered the legal claim for sexual harassment and, with Andrea Dworkin, created ordinances recognizing pornography as a civil rights violation and the Swedish model for addressing prostitution. The Supreme Court of Canada has largely accepted her approaches to equality, pornography, and hate speech.

In her visiting lecture to University of Chicago Law School students, Professor MacKinnon discussed issues raised in her book Are Women Human?: And Other International Dialogues. Her work exposes the consequences and significance of the systematic maltreatment of women and its systemic condonation by taking us inside the workings of nation-states, where the oppression of women defines community life and distributes power in society and government, and inside the heart of the international law of conflict to ask why the international community can rally against terrorists' violence, but not violence against women.

Catherine MacKinnon, the Elizabeth A. Long Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School specializes in sex equality issues under international and constitutional law. She pioneered the legal claim for sexual harassment and, with Andrea Dworkin, created ordinances recognizing pornography as a civil rights violation and the Swedish model for addressing prostitution. Representing Bosnian women survivors of Serbian genocidal sexual atrocities, she won Kadic v. Karadzic, whcih first recognized rape as an act of genocide. Her scholarly books include Toward a Feminist Theory of the State (1989), Sex Equality (2001/2007), and Are Women Human? (2006).

"Trafficking, Prostitution, and Inequality." Harv. C. R -C. L. L. Rev. 46, no. 2 (2011): 271-310. Full Text: Hein (UMich users) | Hein | Lexis | Westlaw